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October 30, 2013 Comments (66) Views: 2954 Latency, Latin America, Politics

Google DNS Departs Brazil Ahead of New Law

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Update (4:20PM, 22 Nov 2013):

In response to recent NSA spying allegations, Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week. However, Google’s DNS service started leaving the country on September 12th, the day President Rousseff announced her intention to require local storage of user data.

Brazil is the largest economy in Latin America and one of the fastest growing domestic Internets in the world. If companies like Google feel like they have to stop providing local service in such a significant market due to new restrictions on their in-country operations, Brazilian Internet users and multinational content providers could ultimately both suffer as a result of the new legislation. In all likelihood, Google is taking a “wait and see” approach to determine how to legally provision their services in Brazil. When they do, perhaps we’ll see the return of low-latency, local caches for their freely available DNS service. Internet-Growth-Mexico-vs-Brazil

Google DNS in Brazil

As most readers of this blog will know, when you access any resource on the Internet by name (e.g., www.google.com), your computer must first convert this name into an IP address (e.g., 74.125.131.99), which it then uses to gain access to the resource you’ve requested. This conversion process, called DNS or Domain Name System, is typically transparently furnished to users by their Internet service provider. Since December 2009, Google has offered their own version of this service for free to the public, branded as Google Public DNS, at the well-known IP addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.

While Google DNS provides a public benefit to many, all “free” services ultimately have to be paid for somehow. By gaining visibility into the Internet usage of its users, Google can use this data to improve its commercial applications, such as the placement of advertisements. It is this user data that would presumably make Google Public DNS subject to the more stringent privacy laws proposed by President Rousseff.

However, no one is forced to use Google DNS. As we noted, most ISPs (and companies) provide their own DNS services to their users. For those who don’t or for those users who prefer using third party service, Google DNS is one of several open public DNS services. (Dyn and OpenDNS offer two others.) In Brazil, we’ve read that smaller ISPs often use Google DNS service from São Paulo as part of their services.

Last month, we noticed that Google DNS for Latin America had stopped answering queries from São Paulo and had started forwarding DNS queries back to the US for resolution. We presented this development at NANOG 59 and in a blog post earlier this month about Internet performance. Nobody from Google would comment. By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly.

Below are graphs of the latencies measured for several locations around Latin America over the course of 2013. Latencies abruptly jumped when DNS queries began getting passed back to the US instead of being handled in São Paulo. (Another lesser known Google DNS IP address, 216.239.32.10, was also moved back to the US on 16 September.)

8.8.4.4 8.8.8.8

After others in the region confirmed the change in Google DNS service on the LACNOG email list, one participant asked, “Hay gente de Google en la lista. Podrían aclararnos un poco la razón” (there are people from Google on this email list. Could they clarify the reason [for the change]?). There was no response.

Google did acknowledge the change on September 24th, but did not disclose a cause:

Currently queries to Google DNS from Brazil (and maybe other South American countries as well) are handled by resolvers in the United States. Consequently you may experience longer latency than before. We are sorry about this inconvenience to you and are working to restart resolvers in Brazil in the near future.

When I asked a Google contact if this was a technical issue or a policy decision, I was referred to Google’s public affairs office.

Conclusion

It seems only prudent that upon hearing of the new privacy law in Brazil, Google would begin the process of discontinuing its services there, pending a review of the final legislation by their lawyers. Such a review could decide how Google can restart local services in Brazil, such as Google DNS.

Alternatively, if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country (Mexico? Colombia?), with privacy laws more to their liking. In addition, this development could spur local competition to Google, perhaps with government encouragement, as we’ve seen with China’s Baidu and Russia’s Yandex. This would not necessarily be a bad thing for Brazil, and the region as a whole, in the long run.

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66 Responses to Google DNS Departs Brazil Ahead of New Law

  1. […] Google pulls (some) infrastructure out of Brazil ahead of new privacy laws being enacted, which themselves are largely in reaction to the NSA spying on everything: http://www.renesys.com/2013/10/googl…ahead-new-law/ […]

  2. Chris Short says:

    216.239.32.10 is not the same as 8.8.8.8 in the sense that it allows public resolution.

  3. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  4. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  5. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  6. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  7. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  8. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  9. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  10. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  11. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  12. […] escribió el miércoles que Google comenzó DNS empuje ( consultas de Domain Name System) de Brasil a […]

  13. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pulling DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  14. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  15. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  16. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  17. […] wrote &#959&#1495 Wednesday t&#1211&#1072t Google b&#1077&#609&#1072&#1495 pushing DNS (Domain Name […]

  18. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  19. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  20. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  21. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  22. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  23. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  24. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  25. LeonardoAmaral says:

    Im sorry but blame Brazillian laws faces Brazilian sovereignty. Google unpublished ther BGP announces to PTT-BR Multilateral Traffic Agreement but telecoms like CTBC still having GGC and Google contents locally.
    I can proof it using a Brazillian Video of youtube. Since this place brokes plain-text format, please refer to http://pastebin.com/Wmnx63rB (Line 15 forward).
     Remember: DNS does not store personal information when its not autoritative. Caches store.

  26. […] El servicio de DNS de Google deja Brasil el mismo día del anuncio de la nueva ley de Internet (eng)… […]

  27. […] Google DNS Departs Brazil Ahead of New Law – Renesys […]

  28. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  29. renesys says:

    LeonardoAmaral 
    Hi Leonardo,
    Thanks for your comment. Yes, Google Global Cache (GGC) services are still present within the networks of ISPs in Brazil.
    Google DNS resolution moved out of Brazil last month. The chief feature of Google DNS is its ability to return fast responses. Why suddenly move it out of Brazil and negate that feature?
    While DNS itself doesn’t inherently store web activity, Google does use information (like what websites are visited) gleaned from Google DNS for their commercial applications.

  30. renesys says:

    @Chris Short Thanks for the clarification, Chris.

  31. ronkass says:

    Great!. Brazil can be like Russia and China!.. Now.. where is the Rolleyes emoticon?

  32. javsmo says:

    This is the result of 12 years of Workers Party on government… Soon we’ll have to search web with “cadê”… Ops, “cadê”was bought by Yahoo! some years ago. So, the government will have to create a state-owned company and a ministry of search to provide web search to us.

  33. […] Google utiliza servidores basados ​​en los Estados Unidos para responder a las consultas de direcciones del sitio Web de Brasil después que el presidente del país ha propuesto leyes de privacidad más fuertes, según la firma de monitorización de Internet Renesys . […]

  34. […] >> CRASH: Google DNS departs Brazil ahead of new law, by Doug Madory: “Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week… By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly… if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country… with privacy laws more to their liking.” Renesys […]

  35. […] >> CRASH: Google DNS departs Brazil ahead of new law, by Doug Madory: “Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week… By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly… if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country… with privacy laws more to their liking.” Renesys […]

  36. […] In response to recent NSA spying allegations, Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws.  […]

  37. […] like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, subject to domestic privacy laws [Renesys’ Doug […]

  38. LeonardoAmaral says:

    edufrazao Any country have you sovereignty guaranteed. You polithics opinion doesnt count in international relationship and doesnt change the international rules.

  39. renesys says:

    Diego F Duarte Yes, it still works from Brazil. However, the responses are now coming from servers in the United States instead of Sao Paulo.
    “By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly.”

  40. […] >> CRASH: Google DNS departs Brazil ahead of new law, by Doug Madory: “Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week… By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly… if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country… with privacy laws more to their liking.” Renesys […]

  41. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  42. LeonardoAmaral says:

    edufrazao So, you doesnt matter too :P

  43. CassioREskelsen says:

    edufrazao LeonardoAmaral baba-ovo. Empresa que não quer seguir nossa legislação (que no caso não é nem um pouco abusiva) pode fazer o favor de vazar mesmo.
    Nosso dinheiro é bom mas nossos direitos são negados?

  44. […] wrote on Wednesday that Google began pushing DNS (Domain Name System) queries from Brazil to U.S.-based […]

  45. […] >> CRASH: Google DNS departs Brazil ahead of new law, by Doug Madory: “Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week… By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly… if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country… with privacy laws more to their liking.” Renesys […]

  46. LeandroBattochio says:

    Diego F Duarte read the article before posting something!

  47. […] nacional. A empresa que faz medição e monitoramento de atividades na internet em escala global, Renesys, notou que o serviço DNS (Domain Name System) do Google (o Google DNS) para a América Latina […]

  48. […] dentro do país. Assim, eles estarão sujeitos às nossas leis de privacidade. Segundo o portal Renesys, apesar de a lei ainda não ter sido aprovada oficialmente, o DNS da Google já começou a ser […]

  49. […] dentro do país. Assim, eles estarão sujeitos às nossas leis de privacidade. Segundo o portal Renesys, apesar de a lei ainda não ter sido aprovada oficialmente, o DNS da Google já começou a ser […]

  50. aicredo says:

    LeandroBattochio porquê está respondendo em inglês?

  51. […] O Google está usando servidores baseados nos Estados Unidos para responder a consultas de endereços de sites do Brasil depois que a presidente do País propôs leis de privacidade mais fortes, de acordo com a empresa de monitoramento de Internet Renesys. […]

  52. henriquegrolli says:

    javsmo Please, before you comment make sure you use facts and arguments and not only preconceived answers that you make no justification of.
    The internet infra-structure of Brazil have a low standard for most services and aways had and that is not a recent political enviroment but a long standing market relation we have with our carriers. We had a LOT of recent advances in the law and governament overview made by ANATEL that really improved the general internet quality in the country and we can actualy measure that on our platform and applications.
    The market factor is still overly dominant for quality and that explains why São Paulo might have a excelent DNS service then Ceará given by the same company in what could be the same infra-structure.
    DNSs are a technology that is distributed and very well dominated, we can still do very well without this Google service. Wich also makes me think you have no ideal how the global internet infra-structure actualy works.

  53. javsmo says:

    henriquegrolli 
    I’m glad you mentioned ANATEL. It is joke today. A bad taste one. It was conceived to regulate the telecommunications companies, but today it only serves to the PT party fellows receive jobs. Before the PT era, it was common to make a complaint and the companies used to obey ANATEL and solve your problem. Last year I opened several tickets (six or seven) against my landline phone carrier at ANATEL because of the same problem and their answer was always the same. “We only register the complaint and send it to the carrier, sir, we can’t do anything else”. It wasn’t this way before the PT era. I think this is a fact, Henrique.

  54. LeandroBattochio says:

    aicredo Porque é um site inglês?

  55. […] all content locally in each country. I am not making this up.  The fallout has already started in Brazil, Germany, China and Russia.  And I think it’s going downhill from here pretty […]

  56. BuySellBandwidth says:

    Brazil is the tip of the iceberg.  I think first the EU, then followed by BRICS countries and then other large countries like Indonesia will follow.  Read my analysis of this news: http://bit.ly/1ajzSWw

  57. […] O Google está usando servidores baseados nos Estados Unidos para responder a consultas de endereços de sites do Brasil depois que a presidente do País propôs leis de privacidade mais fortes, de acordo com a empresa de monitoramento de Internet Renesys. […]

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